Hitler’s Art

Before amassing his fortune with the enormous royalties from the publication of his hugely popular Mein Kampf, Hitler earned a living by using his artistic skills to produce paintings that were sold to the public or used for postcards. Hitler was a great student of the fine arts and studied music, opera, painting, sculpture, and architecture. While living in Vienna under conditions of poverty, he read voraciously and still managed to spend whatever meager income he had to attend lectures, concerts, opera, and the theater. Even when he barely had enough money to survive he refused to compromise and always purchased the best paints, brushes, paper, and canvas. As a remarkably prolific artist, he is estimated to have created between 2000 and 3000 drawings, watercolors, and oil paintings. His artistic talent revealed itself at an early age and continued painting and drawing throughout his life. Even while behind the front lines in World War 1, he continued to paint in his spare time and contributed instructional drawings and cartoons to the military newspaper. His art continued throughout his leadership of Germany and included detailed building plans, furniture design, city planning, and monuments.

Perhaps the notion of an artist becoming a political seems strange in the current era where politics are dominated by professional politicians, it was Hitler’s profound artistic vision that translated from his dreams into reality the Autobahn, Volkswagen, Rocket Science, and in the general the groundwork for a prosperous people and flourishing culture before this was lost in World War 2.

Just as the ancient Greeks wrote about the unique qualifications of a philosopher to be a leader, an artist’s unique perspective and instinctual drive to create something out of nothing makes the artist uniquely qualified to lead and inspire a nation.

Advertisements

4 Comments

  1. I have seen some of Hitler’s architectural studies, but have not seen any of his more acedemic works such as these. The mountain view looks somewhat like the Matterhorn and is quite interesting.

  2. Even in this political climate the notion of an artist becoming a politician isn’t that strange. Many artists focus on highly political issues and therefore may take their interest to another level by getting involved in politics its self.

    What I think is more surprising about Hitler’s art is, from the examples I’ve seen, much of it is very calm, serene and even soothing. You’d think a leader of Hitler’s passion might produce artworks that express some of his ideas and views with perhaps a little more turmoil.

  3. If only the guy had become a painter istead of that “uniqueñly qualified” leader! His dilettantism and subjectivity made him a dangerous demogogue. He couldn’t listen. Plato by the way wouldn’t allow the painter in his Republic because the painter was only concerned with the appearances of things, not the Truth, which was the philosopher’s pursuit. The painter deceived.

  4. Sorry about the mistakes in my comment. Maybe my eyes are going but I have trouble seeing what I write on that black background. Also–isn’t the font very small?
    INSTEAD UNIQUELY DEMAGOGUE
    I hope you show Churchill’s paintings here too. He must have painted as many as Hitler. And he was one of the great men of our Western tradition. Hitler would have made us all slaves.


Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s