Tumbleweed – A New Addition

Tumbleweed is my latest painting on a painting.I created a painting and on top another painting. Tumbleweed was created on a 2.5cm deep canvas so is suitable to hang straight on your wall or in a nice frame.I hope you enjoy this heart-warming piece.The colours are so difficult to capture with a camera, which is especially annoying when you know how beautiful they are. I think I have done this one justice though.

Acrylic on canvas

61cm x 92cm x 2.5cm

Tumbleweed 3
Tumbleweed by James Presley
Advertisements

What do I think?

The thing I liked about doing this painting was the beautiful violet blue color didn’t really stand out till after I finished.  That’s what I noticed, and that’s what I thought.  This is another piece done on unstretched canvas.  Great fun.

What do I think 3
What do I think? Acrylic on canvas, 56 x 99cm By James Presley

3 Billboards Outside Plymouth, England

I kind of named this painting inspired a little bit by the movie. I found the billboards in the movie quite moving so I painted my own. Mine have my own message and it isn’t so tragic as the film, but it’s a lot more positive. The billboards are almost empty so you can add your own thoughts to them however you please. This painting is done on unstretched canvas which is 87 cm x 99cm from edge to edge and the painting itself is 65cm x 99cm. I actually prefer it unstretched but you can get it stretched if you want.

3_Billboards_Outside_Plymouth_England 3

Review: Picasso at Tate Modern ★★★★★ – BBC News

I’d love to see this

Review: Picasso at Tate Modern ★★★★★
Will Gompertz Arts editor @WillGompertzBBC on Twitter

10 March 2018

One of the best things about Tate Modern’s Picasso exhibition is it contains some terrible art. I mean real howlers. Paintings in which we see the modern master fluffing his lines and losing his form.

via Review: Picasso at Tate Modern ★★★★★ – BBC News

Abstract Expressionism and the Cold War

Suites Culturelles

faa68-vogue Cecil Beaton, The New Soft Look © 1951 by The Condé Nast Publications.

Every so often, a painter has to destroy painting. Cezanne did it, Picasso did it with cubism. Then Pollock did it. He busted our idea of a picture all to hell. Then there could be new paintings again. (Willem de Kooning, 1956)

On March 1, 1951 Vogue magazine published four pages of photographs by Cecil Beaton, in which two models showed the latest fashion creations in front of Jackson Pollock’s Lavender Mist, Number 28, Number 27, and Autumn Rhythm. The Vogue photographs exemplify the dichotomy of American culture in the 1950s: the contrast between Pollock’s paintings and the dresses emphasized the split between conformity within Cold War culture and the avant-garde modernism of post-war America. When Christian Dior introduced his New Look shortly after WWII, bringing back the corseted hour-glass-figure look, as well as lavish skirts…

View original post 3,677 more words