My Picasso

I’ve recently discovered a place where I can purchase all kinds of great books at incredibly low prices.  I used to have a large collection of art books about some of my favourite artists, but due to circumstances out of my control all were lost, so I have gradually started replacing them and adding a few extra.

 

La Vie
La Vie, 1903

 

I recently came into possession of Picasso, by Carsten-Peter Warncke, which is an amazing book following Picasso’s journey through his different periods.  To be honest, before I got this book I had only had an interest in Picasso’s Cubist art, I knew of other styles and periods but hadn’t really taken much notice.  I didn’t know what I had been missing.

 

Mother and Child
Mother and Child, 1905

They are just some of the most beautiful paintings, with so much emotion, depth, and feeling, taking you inside the painting and capturing everything in the expressions and hands of the subjects.

 

The Acrobats Family with Monkey
The Acrobat’s Family with Monkey, 1905

 

So I have included a few here that I liked a lot and some details of hands that I could already see developing towards the cubist paintings that he later did.

 

The Death of Harlequin (detail)
The Death of Harlequin (detail), 1906

 

The Acrobats Family with Monkey (detail)
The Acrobat’s Family with Monkey (detail), 1905

 

 

 

I strongly recommend purchasing the book for study and inspiration.

(images from book Picasso by Carsten-Peter Warncke, published 1998)
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The Cemetery Caretaker Who Covered His Cottage in Mind-Bending Mosaics

Feature image: Roel Wijnants

 

Raymond Isidore didn’t plan on becoming an artist—let alone a sculptor who would go on to cover nearly every surface of his small home with glittering mosaics. But after a fateful stroll in 1938, when a shiny piece of broken crockery caught his eye, Isidore devoted the majority of the remainder of his life on the outskirts of Chartres, France, to the creation of one of the world’s most unique homes—an ecstatic expression of the untrained artist’s bursting imagination.

Isidore was born into a humble family in Chartres in 1900, and as a young man landed a position as the caretaker of a local cemetery. By all accounts, he led a provincial life; he married a woman roughly 10 years his senior and bought a humble plot of land not far from the famed Chartres Cathedral. There, Isidore built what began as a simple cottage, but soon transformed into his masterwork, known as La Maison Picassiette, which still stands and is accessible to the public today.

With the passion and discerning eye of a new collector, Isidore began his project by pocketing all of the broken bits of pottery and glass he could find. His sources were the fields and trash repositories around his home; he believed that “what people disdain and reject in quarries and dumps can still serve,” he once explained of his growing cache of discards.

At first, he had no objective other than to keep the eye-catching shards. “I picked them up without any specific intention, for their colors and their flicker,” he later recalled. “I sorted the good, [discarded] the bad. I piled them up in a corner of my garden.” ……. Read on

via The Cemetery Caretaker Who Covered His Cottage in Mind-Bending Mosaics

Lana Del Rey: My art and her art

When we create we may like to do it in silence or wemay like to have some music going in the background.  I have recently discovered Lana Del Rey, and the more I listen, the more I love it.

Photographer:  Nicole Nodland

Her voice is so haunting and soothing, it’s kinde of like Twin Peaks mixed with a bit of bubble gum.  I can’t really describe it, but it just goes around in my head and I really love to paint while listening to her.

And the lyrics…..

Thanks Lana

Blind Spot: Orange Blots out the Black

I’ve been wondering

I’ve been thinking

I’ve been stroking

I’ve been brushing

I’ve been flicking

I’ve been splashing

I’ve been dripping

I’ve been tripping

And….. I hit a Blind Spot!!!

 

Blindspot 2
Blind Spot By James Presley