Chacun de nous: Each of us.

Latest piece of artwork:
Chacun de nous
Acrylic on canvas
76 x 51 x 3.8cm

chacun de nous 1

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Women Artists in Ascendance

Spotlight on Helen Frankenthaler

Excerpts from Life Magazine, 13th May 1957.  How times have changed.

 

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Helen Frankenthaler, Blue Territory, 1955

In the art-filled centuries of the past, women rarely took up serious careers as painters or sculptors.  Of the daring few that did, barely a handful achieved any lasting stature.  I America, where during the 19th Century every well-bred young lady learned to while away idle moments painting pious scenes and sedate still lifes, art as a profession was left to men.  Today the picture has changed.  A sizable and remarkable group of young women is resolutely at work and their art is being sought by leading museums, galleries, and collectors.

 

One such young artist of the time was a graduate of Bennington College in Vermont, by the name of Helen Frankenthaler.  She started by painting realistic landscapes and moved towards an abstract style to express her emotional response to nature.  In her New York studio, she spread her canvas on the floor and often worked in the middle of it.  Helen was a major contributor to American postwar painting and she continued to paint and exhibit throughout her life.  Helen died in 2011 aged 83.

 

 

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Helen Frankenthaler, Flirt 1995

 

 

The Artsy Podcast, No. 62: The Myth of Jackson Pollock and the Masterpiece Created in One Night

This month on the Artsy Podcast, we’re translating four of our readers’ favorite art-historical stories into audio. On this episode: the dramatic story behind Jackson Pollock’s largest painting, why it’s undoubtedly exaggerated—and why that doesn’t diminished its significance in the famed Abstract Expressionist’s oeuvre.

Hopefully you can listen to the podcast here Mural: Jackson Pollock, 1943

If not, the below YouTube vidis quite interesting or you can click the link to the source on Artsy, also below.

via The Artsy Podcast, No. 62: The Myth of Jackson Pollock and the Masterpiece Created in One Night

A Portrait and a Dream

Featured image: A Portrait and a Dream (1953) By Jackson Pollock

I was just reading an article that someone had posted about the featured image and it really got my back up.  I absolutely hate it when people say “my kids could do that”,  I really would like to see that.  I might be being a bit biased as I love and admire the work of Jackson Pollock.  I see something in it that I don’t in other works by other artists.

I would spend a lot longer looking at Summertime and being moved by it than I would if you put me in front of the Mona Lisa.

Summertime: Number 9A 1948 by Jackson Pollock 1912-1956
Summertime: Number 9A 1948 Jackson Pollock 1912-1956 Purchased 1988 Tate Modern

I remember the first time I saw the painting in London, I didn’t even know it was being exhibited there and the feelings of emotions sent shivers down my spine.

This method of painting is not about throwing paint at the canvas and hoping for the best, there is so much more to it than that.  It’s about being one with the paint, the canvas and forming shapes, lines, and movements which are controlled into what can be a beautiful piece of art.

 

 

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The Olive Branch By James Presley

 

 

I know that Pollock worked on some of his paintings for months and others he did overnight, but he must have had something because there are still many people who would give anything to have an original.

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Something – Out there! By James Presley

 

 

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Birth By Jackson Pollock